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With energy-intensive industries currently producing approximately 24% of global emissions, the UK CCUS & Hydrogen Decarbonisation Summit will address the latest developments and opportunities across the Carbon Capture, Utilisation & Storage (CCUS) and Hydrogen sectors, and determine strategies for greater decarbonisation of the energy intensive industries.

Agenda

“ With decarbonisation across all sectors of the UK economy taking centre stage throughout the 2020’s, meeting carbon emission targets and supporting the development of clean technologies have become the building blocks to Britain’s decarbonised future. ”

With decarbonisation across all sectors of the UK economy taking centre stage throughout the 2020’s, meeting carbon emission targets and supporting the development of clean technologies have become the building blocks to Britain’s decarbonised future. The transition to a cleaner, smarter power system is well underway, with innovation propelling the sector forward. With energy-intensive industries currently producing approximately 24% of global emissions, the UK CCUS & Hydrogen Decarbonisation Summit will address the latest developments and opportunities across the Carbon Capture, Utilisation & Storage (CCUS) and Hydrogen sectors, and determine strategies for greater decarbonisation of the energy intensive industries. Bringing together decarbonisation policy makers, industry and innovators, the two-day summit will address approaches for accelerating the rollout of innovative decarbonising technologies.

Sessions One and Two

Session 1 - Policy & Future Outlook

Meeting carbon emission targets, whilst also being able to manage the energy demands of the UK economy, is a challenge policy makers, industry and innovators have to face together. With the global hydrogen market tipped to rise to £1.9 trillion by 2050, establishing a hydrogen economy in the UK is becoming a key component of government decarbonisation strategy, alongside the government’s commitment to CCUS, including new funding support of up to £170 million for heavy industry ‘net-zero carbon’ clusters by 2040. This session will review the latest policy developments within the UK hydrogen & CCUS markets and the impact upon decarbonisation of the economy. Discussion will cover key policy measures required to successfully implement CCUS & hydrogen, the £20 million Hydrogen Supply programme, UK government commitment to accelerating the production of hydrogen & CCUS, short & long-term policy initiatives, pushing the UK to become a global leader for CCUS technology, international perspectives, and roadmaps for building an interconnected & interdependent hydrogen economy.

Schedule:

  • 9:05 Chair Opening Address
  • 9:10 Stuart Mckay, Head of Hydrogen Policy, Scottish Government

    2020 Vision: Hydrogen - the missing link?
  • 9:30 Mike Tholen, Sustainability Director, Oil & Gas UK

    Embracing CCS – emerging opportunities for the UK’s Energy Economy

    For too long carbon capture and storage has been the absent guest within the UK’s energy mix. After two decades of trying to get Carbon Capture and Storage off the ground things are changing rapidly. With careful orchestration, the UK could be come a European Leader in carbon capture use and storage building on its North Sea heritage. This paper examines how this can best be achieved and considers what is needed for the UK to upscale and export its emerging CCS capability.
  • 9:50 Luca Corradi, Innovation Network Director, Oil & Gas Technology Centre

    The role of the Oil & Gas Offshore Industry in the transition to a Low Carbon Economy in the UK
  • 10:10 Katherine Jackson, Technical Director, WSP

    In this session Katherine will offer an international perspective on policy measures to successfully implement CCUS & hydrogen, including a brief overview of policy measures being used in other countries, and how successful these have been so far.
  • 10:30 Chris Stark, CEO, Committee on Climate Change

    Getting to Net Zero
  • 10:50 Q & A
  • 11:00 Coffee & Networking

Session 2 - Energy Mix

CCUS has been deemed a key component of the energy mix and a necessary tool for meeting the UK’s climate change targets. With the UK offering an incredibly favourable environment for supporting CCUS, through existing oil & gas industry capabilities and geological resources, the potential for its adoption is becoming increasingly significant. Possibilities for applying CCUS to many areas of the economy make it an incredibly useful technology for decarbonisation, with CCUS often deemed the most cost effective and in many cases the only option for decarbonising some industrial processes. This session will evaluate the place for CCUS in the UK energy mix, and its broader role in reducing emissions, and decarbonising fossil fuel intensive industries. CCUS as a critical enabling technology for low-carbon hydrogen will also be discussed alongside hydrogen as a key technology for meeting 2050 climate change targets.

Schedule:

  • 11:45 Mark Herring, Strategy Lead, National Grid System Operator;

    Both Hydrogen and CCUS have an important role to play in the transition to net zero, and each have a range of potential applications in decarbonising heat, transport and industry. Mark will explore the thinking behind National Grid Electricity System Operator’s Future Energy Scenarios and how this work considers integrating these technologies into the whole energy system of the future.
  • 12:05 Mathew Hindle, Head of Gas, Energy Networks Association

    A Pathway for Decarbonising the Gas Network” work for you?

    In 2019, ENA launched a major report on “Pathways to Net Zero” on behalf of the GB gas transmission and distribution networks. Now, the networks are working to take forward the recommendations of the report and deliver decarbonised gas for consumers across the country. This presentation will set out the Pathway and the role of CCUS in supporting its delivery.
  • 12:25 Corin Taylor, Principal Consultant, DNV GL Limited

    “Achieving net zero in the UK with hydrogen and CCS”

    • The challenges of the hard to decarbonise sectors;
    • What’s needed for net zero;
    • How decarbonised gas – hydrogen and CCS – can help;
    • Project examples;
    • Why financial mechanisms for roll-out are now key e.g. a CfD or equivalent
  • 12:45 Tony Alderson, Technical Lead Oil & Gas, WSP

    The Role of CCUS and Hydrogen in Industrial Decarbonisation

    How CCUS and Hydrogen can play a role in the decarbonisation of energy intensive industries. Covering the ‘2050 Industrial Decarbonisation Roadmaps’ study delivered by WSP and DNV-GL for the UK Government.
  • 13:05 Q&A
  • 13:15 Lunch & Networking

Session Three

Session 3 - 4- Projects and Infrastructure

There is a substantial need to upgrade UK infrastructure in order to accommodate the broader implementation of CCUS & hydrogen technology. With the UK government aiming to develop CCUS at scale by the 2030s, and high capital & operational investment needed to establish a full hydrogen infrastructure network, evolving the UK’s energy infrastructure is key to the successful deployment of such technology. This session will focus upon strategies for evolving UK energy infrastructure to incorporate new energy sources, alongside discussion of existing CCUS and hydrogen projects. Discussion will include developing a carbon dioxide infrastructure network to support decarbonisation, how best to deploy infrastructure, potential for re-using existing infrastructure such as that of the Central North Sea, developing CCUS in industrial centres to build a shared carbon dioxide infrastructure network, workforce capacity, repurposing existing gas distribution networks for use with hydrogen, broader projects focused on end use, building a hydrogen supply chain, and utilising a blend of hydrogen & natural gas as a transition option to move toward a 100% hydrogen grid in parts of the UK. Case study sessions will focus on current projects and future plans for helping the UK achieve its carbon targets and ensure the major carbon producing sectors are on the path to become carbon neutral. Key themes will include CCUS project results to date, reducing costs, drawing upon global experience to determine how CCUS technologies could transform the UK industrial sector and reduce carbon emissions. The need for collaboration between private and public sectors to lower costs and remove barriers to wider deployment will also be discussed.

Schedule:

  • 13:55 Chairs opening address
  • 14:00 David Parkin, Director Progressive Energy

    HyNet: A low-cost, low-risk, deliverable hydrogen and CCUS project

    The HyNet project has been in development since 2016 and provides the backbone of decarbonising the North West industrial cluster through carbon capture from major industrial emitters and fuel switching of other industrial sources to low carbon hydrogen. This presentation will talk through engineering progress on the project over the last 12 months and next steps in 2020.
  • 14:20 Adrian Finn, Process Technology Manager, Costain

    This presentation will discuss the importance of large-scale hydrogen production in meeting climate change objectives and how decarbonisation influences the choice of efficient auto-thermal reforming for hydrogen production, to provide high carbon capture and to reduce costs. It will be shown how auto-thermal reforming presents the opportunity to use efficient, low-energy carbon capture technology so that carbon is made available at elevated pressure and/or as liquid. This greatly reduces carbon dioxide compression costs. This approach provides the lowest overall cost for large-scale hydrogen production with carbon dioxide being suitable for storage.
  • 14:40 Mark Lewis, Technology & Innovation Officer, Tees Valley Combined Authority

    Achieving a Net Zero Tees Valley

    The presentation will set out the reasons why the Tees Valley could make this reality and outline the projects being developed to transform a region with one of the highest per capita emissions to one of the lowest, making the UK’s 2050 target possible.
  • 15:00 Colin McGill, Project Director, Net Zero Teesside

    Net Zero Teesside.

    The presentation will outline how Net Zero Teesside aims to decarbonise a cluster of carbon-intensive businesses by as early as 2030 and deliver the UK’s first zero-carbon industrial cluster.
  • 15:20 Q&A
  • 15:30 Coffee Networking
  • 15:45 Suzie Ferguson, Wood

    “Concept Development for Decarbonisation”.

    This presentation will introduce the application of a rigorous approach to concept development to projects with goals related to decarbonisation of existing assets and carbon footprint minimisation of new assets and creation of zero carbon clusters. Specific technical considerations relating to use of hydrogen and application of carbon capture and storage are highlighted.
  • 16:05 Dr Hannah Sophia, Innovation Manager, Siemens Plc

    Breaking Bad - The Case for synthetic fuels - methanol

    Energy transition almost certainly includes a challenge to conventions.
    A great number of opportunities are available to us to generate greener synthetic fuels and chemicals from CO2.
    Examples of new technology use are explored together with a focus on Power-to-Fuel plants as the missing link for electricity-based fuels and the utilisation of existing liquid fuel infrastructure.
  • 16:25 Dan Sadler, Low Carbon Solutions Project Manager, Equinor,

    Hydrogen, BECCS and CCS in the Humber

    The Humber Industrial Decarbonisation Deployment Project (Humber-DP) has brought together world class organisations with a shared goal of decarbonising the Humber region. Humber-DP’s primary ambition is to deliver a low carbon industrial cluster by 2030 in the Humber, which is the UK’s largest industrial cluster by both emissions and geography. This will be achieved by developing world-leading low carbon infrastructure including a CO2 transportation and storage network along with an ambitious, at scale, fuel switching (hydrogen) programme, CO2 capture from industrial emitters and BECCS.
  • 16:50 Cluster Collaboration Panel Discussion

    Chaired by Jo Coleman, UK Energy Transition Manager, Shell

    Dave Richardson, H2/CCUS Director. Costain

    Mark Lewis, Low Carbon Manager, Tees Valley Combined Authority

    Colin McGill, Project Director, Net Zero Teesside

    Mark Neller, Director Arup

    David Parkin, Director, Progressive Energy
  • 17:15 End of Conference

Sessions One and Two

Session 1 - Hydrogen Production & Projects

This session will look into current and planned hydrogen projects across the UK. Key themes will include results and developments to date, alongside economic benefits such as job creation and supporting other industries. Discussion will also cover integrating a variety of low carbon technologies into large-scale hydrogen trials, maximising efficiencies in the production process, reducing costs to enable competitive production of large volumes of hydrogen, waste to hydrogen, hydrogen production through steam methane reformation, utilising surplus renewable energy for producing hydrogen, and injecting hydrogen into the gas grid.

Schedule:

  • 9:25 Chairs Opening address, Corin Taylor, Decarbonised Gas Alliance
  • 9:50 Antony Green,Head of Engineering and Asset Management, National Grid Gas Transmission

    How hydrogen can shape the future of heat?

    o The potential of hydrogen in decarbonisation
    o Projects underway to prove the case for hydrogen and provide evidence base for growth
    o Obstacles to establishing a clear future pathway for decarbonised gas networks
    o Implications for assets in a hydrogen future
  • 10:10 Hayleigh Pearson,Project Engineer, Marginal Developments Solution Centre Oil & Gas Technology Centre,

    Title: Role of Hydrogen in a Net Zero North Sea

    This presentation will explore the potential of hydrogen in a Net Zero North Sea and provide a case study of the Hydrogen Offshore Production (HOP) project. The HOP project addressed the opportunity of offshore hydrogen production by re-using existing oil & gas infrastructure across the UKCS, and was funded as part of the Hydrogen Supply Programme. A summary of the key findings will be given as well as an outline of the next steps.
  • 10:30 Kevin Kinsella, Partner Low Carbon Energy Transition, ERM

    ERM Dolphyn Project – Large Scale Hydrogen Production from Offshore Floating Wind


    The presentation will describe ERM’s Dolphyn project, concerning the production of ‘green’ hydrogen at scale from offshore wind. The project comprises an innovative floating semi-submersible (floating platform) design with integrated wind turbine, PEM electrolysis and desalination facilities. It will enable the most favourable UK offshore wind resources to be accessed in deep water at distances from land up to several hundred kilometres. A single 10MW unit will produce in excess of 800 Te of hydrogen per year, exported back to shore via a pipeline. The project is currently at FEED stage with a 2MW prototype scheduled for operation by 2024.

    Molly Iliffe, Senior Consultant, ERM

    The Hydrogen Opportunity for the UK

    The development of the UK hydrogen economy represents a significant opportunity for UK companies that effectively position themselves, and a transformational economic opportunity for the UK as a whole. ERM assisted the Offshore Wind Innovation Hub, with Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult as a key delivery partner, to analyse the potential economic impacts of different UK hydrogen market development scenarios. The associated barriers and enablers underlying these scenarios were considered, and the areas of the UK supply chain that may be at the greatest level of readiness to capture the potential opportunities were identified. In this presentation the key assumptions and outcomes of the analysis will be presented, providing insights into the potential economic benefits to the UK of different policy pathways, required public and private investment levels, and key areas of the supply chain which UK businesses may be best placed to capture.
  • 10:50 Q&A
  • 11:00 Coffee & Networking Break
  • 11:45 Matthias Schlegel, Head of Hydrogen, FICHTNER GmbH & Co. KG

    Hydrogen Value Chains: from Production to Applications in Germany

    This CCUS and Hydrogen Decarbonisation Summit is discussing many different hydrogen value chains and applications. But which ones show the most potential and what are the success factors to develop them? In order to answer these questions, this presentation will explain the various hydrogen value chains and evaluate them. Lessons learned from the German market will be used to illustrate the dynamics and provide insights into challenges and approaches in the market.
  • 12:05 Mark Neller, Director, Arup Case Study
  • 12:25 Emma Richardson, Energy and Environment Advisor, National Physical Laboratory

    The role of measurement in a hydrogen economy”
    Exploring the measurement challenges that require addressing for hydrogen to play a significant role in the UK's decarbonisation efforts
  • 12:45 Q&A
  • 12:55 Lunch & Networking

Session 2 - Energy Storage

Storage presents the final step in CO2 management. The application and incorporation of carbon capture, utilisation and storage is also key to the successful development of a ‘hydrogen economy’. This session will take an in depth look at energy storage of CO2 and hydrogen, and the technologies required to make it possible. Discussion will include the technologies required to make it possible, challenges in implementing the most difficult stage in the CCUS chain, and challenges posed as volumes requiring storage increase.

Schedule:

  • 13:55 Chairs Opening address, Corin Taylor, Decarbonised Gas Alliance
  • 14:00 Dr Anna Stork, Silixa Ltd

    Safe and secure CO2 storage with new generation fibre-optic monitoring technologies

    A case study of CO2 storage monitoring with new generation fibre-optic technology will be presented from the Otway project in Australia. Measuring, monitoring and verification (MMV) is a critical element of CO2 storage. Any leakage to surface from a geological storage site poses a risk to the environment and may negate the benefits gained from removing CO2 from the atmosphere. Recent engineering advances in fibre-optic technology have made it possible to monitor and image CO2 storage sites with high precision. Measurements are now possible on a sub-metre scale with signal qualities equal to, or better than, traditional technologies, such as geophones. Distributed fibre-optic acoustic and temperature monitoring now offers on-demand dense measurements and repeatable surveys to determine the evolution of the CO2 plume, understand CO2 composition and phase change effects and highlight any potential leakage pathways. These novel fibre-optic monitoring solutions provide assurance for CO2 transport and long-term storage integrity.
  • 14:25 Energy Storage panel discussion

    Michelle Bentham, Head of Partnerships & Innovation, British Geological Survey

    Anna Stork, Silixa LTD

    Chris Smith, Founder of Kingscote Enterprises Limited
  • 15:00 Coffee & Networking Break

Session Three

Session 3 - Investment & Economics

With the UK already a world leader in renewable energies such as offshore wind, CCUS provides a global economic opportunity for the UK and investment in the sector holds great potential for both continued development and Britain’s export potential. This session will consider investment potential & trends, opportunities for the UK to become global leaders, funding opportunities, public & private partnerships, investing in R&D, and funding initiatives for introducing a greater number of large-scale CCUS plants. Commercial barriers to development will also be addressed, including investment risks, considerable capital requirements, and challenging route-to-market in the UK currently.

Schedule:

  • 15:25 Tara Schmidt, Vice President Strategic Planning Wood

    “On the Road to Net Zero”

    With the UK already a world leader in renewable energies such as offshore wind, CCUS provides a global economic opportunity for the UK and investment in the sector holds great potential for both continued development and Britain’s export potential. This session will consider investment potential & trends, opportunities for the UK to become global leaders, funding opportunities, public & private partnerships, investing in R&D, and funding initiatives for introducing a greater number of large-scale CCUS plants. Commercial barriers to development will also be addressed, including investment risks, considerable capital requirements, and challenging route-to-market in the UK currently.
  • 15:50 Investment & Economics Panel

    Henri Murison, Director Northern Powerhouse Partnership

    Martin Hanton, Technical Director TUV SUD Engineering

    Tara Schmidt, Vice President Strategic Planning Wood

    Dr Gocke Mete, Head of the Knowledge Centre, International Energy Charter
  • 16:20 Conference End

Tickets

2 Day Delegate Ticket (£300 discount) Expires 24/01

  • Single ticket price: £695.00
  • VAT @ 20%: £139.00
  • Total: £834.00

2 Day Delegate Ticket

  • Single ticket price: £995.00
  • VAT @ 20%: £199.00
  • Total: £1,194.00

Speakers

All speakers are invited unless stated confirmed

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